jhenne-bean:

{These sets are comprised of Rapunzelsannalemon -Rapunzel, Elsa, Anna, Honey Lemon- and two special Disney guests! See if you can guess who!}

  1. I am being completely sarcastic in my awe
  2. None of these categories were made up for the sake of loaded language. Each has been used in at least one sincere/serious instance of justification or defense or denial of Disney design similarities.
  3. All these model carbon copies congruities factor right in to Disney’s lack of visible diversity!

Threw this together for a number of reasons. 

Partially because when confronted with this image (or this one or this one or this one or this one or this one or this one or this one or this one) or any of the comparison shots that show the similarity between Rapunzelsannalemon, defenders of the insipid character design consistently bring up the above features to highlight the perceived distinctiveness, or as examples of “unique” and “distinguished” character design differences between the girls.

But mostly because, for all the honey/strawberry/platinum contrast and various neck widths to be found among these characters, they’re all still scooped from the same puddle in Whitelandia. There are so many other manifestations that could be represented— countless other demographics that Disney keeps tossing aside in favor of revisiting the Nth White royal.

image

**It’s also worth noting that while criticism of the similarity among Rapunzelsannalemon has been mentioned as a standalone problem, I bring it up as a sub-point re: analyzing the lack of racial diversity in Disney (Princess) films.

"BUT #EYEBROWS" is also a shitty justification because it contributes to the sidelining of the valid concerns of people who are perpetually erased and marginalized in Disney films (specifically the princess line) let alone the media at large. #Eyebrows-Defense contributes to the belittling, ignoring, and trivializing of those concerns. 

White as default is no accidentDesigns have power. Representation is potent, influential, and formative— and who is sidelined is telling. 

Mind you, Disney is (SUPPOSED TO BE/has positioned themselves as) this outstanding inspiring modern paragon of creativity, design, diversity, and innovation. Yet they have tossed so many sameface white girls at us that one of the strongest defenses of recent designs boils down to hair color and nasolabial folds. Ok. 

This is a matter of them being able to knowingly fall back on the same model, the same design, the same type because they know that they are safe in recycling the same White starting point with new hair, or eyes, or eyebrows, or freckle patterns. They know that they will be defended in their choices to the ends of the earth, despite perpetuating an endless status quo reinforcing whitegirl avalanche.

In their own words, Disney is “the global leader in family entertainment”. The have operations in over 40 countries. They are agents of socialization for countless children. The fact that Disney possesses such power and influence (and that they have such a stake in childhoods) is why who they chose to represent and how often is important! 

Disney is failing to represent an overwhelming segment of their audience, and in that sense, they are failing not only their audience at large, but their own core values. Disney can and should do better. 

While you can certainly enjoy Disney and the work it produces (I do, perhaps surprisingly), please consider being more receptive to criticism and analysis, as well. It matters.

"Movies can and do have tremendous influence in shaping young lives in the realm of entertainment towards the ideals and objectives of normal adulthood."

- Walt Disney

policymic:

American Indian Rapper SupaMan was just named as an MTV Artist of the Week

The news: Christian Parrish Takes the Gun. Remember his name.

The Apsáalooke American Indian hails from the Crow Nation Reservation near Billings, Mont., and on March 21, the MTV Iggy blog named him Artist of the Week from among hundreds of competitors.

What makes him special? Well, he raps under the name “SupaMan,” he sings, he makes crazy drum loops, he’s a champion powwow fancy dancer and sometimes, if you’re lucky, he does all four at the same time.

Read more | Follow policymic

(via america-wakiewakie)

flawlesstitties:

otherbully1:

internetsgreatesthits:

cutebeam:

softboycollective:

postracialcomments:


A Texas man is under arrest after gunning down a SWAT team member as the officer quietly tried to climb in through the apartment’s window during predawn hours.
Police State USAreports  that a resident fatally shot Detective Charles “Chuck” Dinwiddie as the officer climbed in through a ground level window as part of a “no knock” raid. The officers were there due to suspicion that residents were in possession of controlled substances.
Upon hearing a noise, resident Marvin Louis Guy, 50, opened fire on the unidentified officers, shooting three others as well, although only one fatally.
Guy is currently being held on capital murder charges in connection with Dinwiddie’s death, even though it’s unclear how Guy was supposed to know that the men crawling in through the window were police officers since they hadn’t identified themselves.
The evidence sheet lists a laptop, a safe, a pistol, and a glass pipe, but no drugs were found. Given the evidence, why did police deem it necessary to seek a “no knock” warrant and why did a judge sign off on it?
Very little is known about Mr. Guy, but Dinwiddie left behind two children, all because his SWAT team went creeping into a home where the residents didn’t even have any drugs. Is that the best use of law enforcement tax dollars?
Guy’s bond has been set at $3 million dollars.

Source
Thank you lieutenantnorals!

"cop breaks and enters with state approval, gets his ass shot"

brah………………. BRUV……………………..

this happened in Texas where it is perfectly legal to shoot and kill someone who is breaking into your home

Literally everybody knows that in Texas you can open fire on someone who comes onto your property without permission. What in the hell did they expect??

Where the NRA at? In the largest pro-gun state of Texass, those second amendment rights only apply if you’re white.

flawlesstitties:

otherbully1:

internetsgreatesthits:

cutebeam:

softboycollective:

postracialcomments:

A Texas man is under arrest after gunning down a SWAT team member as the officer quietly tried to climb in through the apartment’s window during predawn hours.

Police State USAreports  that a resident fatally shot Detective Charles “Chuck” Dinwiddie as the officer climbed in through a ground level window as part of a “no knock” raid. The officers were there due to suspicion that residents were in possession of controlled substances.

Upon hearing a noise, resident Marvin Louis Guy, 50, opened fire on the unidentified officers, shooting three others as well, although only one fatally.

Guy is currently being held on capital murder charges in connection with Dinwiddie’s death, even though it’s unclear how Guy was supposed to know that the men crawling in through the window were police officers since they hadn’t identified themselves.

The evidence sheet lists a laptop, a safe, a pistol, and a glass pipe, but no drugs were found. Given the evidence, why did police deem it necessary to seek a “no knock” warrant and why did a judge sign off on it?

Very little is known about Mr. Guy, but Dinwiddie left behind two children, all because his SWAT team went creeping into a home where the residents didn’t even have any drugs. Is that the best use of law enforcement tax dollars?

Guy’s bond has been set at $3 million dollars.

Source

Thank you lieutenantnorals!

"cop breaks and enters with state approval, gets his ass shot"

brah………………. BRUV……………………..

this happened in Texas where it is perfectly legal to shoot and kill someone who is breaking into your home

Literally everybody knows that in Texas you can open fire on someone who comes onto your property without permission. What in the hell did they expect??

Where the NRA at? In the largest pro-gun state of Texass, those second amendment rights only apply if you’re white.

(via graygendercosima)

yo-tori:

invisiblelad:

nappynomad:

socialjusticekoolaid:

The Ferguson City Council convened for the first time since Mike Brown’s death, and proved that they literally give no fucks about what the community has to say. Added to their vague, paltry proposed reforms, seems real change will have to come in Ferguson via the ballot box. I don’t care where you live folks— let this be a lesson in voting/participating in your local elections and government! #staywoke #farfromover 

My people getting it!

The city of Ferguson deserves this hornets nest. The last tweet is 100 percent true, they’ve lost the ability to govern, and the disrespect they’ve shown to the citizenry is obvious and beyond contempt. 

Come election time, Ferguson citizens bout to get them the fuck up outta there!

(via the-great-wizard)

angryasiangirlsunited:

Hey, AAGU! I wanted to bring this atrocious piece of journalism to your attention. CSULB’s official student newspaper The Daily 49er has recently published a racist and xenophobic article about China. [x]
Some choice quotes include:

"Also, people in China love to yell, and have no concept of using “inside voices.”"
 ”Overall, people in China neglect to follow many of the social standards that we value in the West.”
"…if I had been one of those insufferable D-bags from the Jersey Shore, I would’ve left behind dozens of people with black eyes"
"Good luck trying to find anyone who is able to speak English."

This was written by the opinions editor of the paper - this person actually manages an entire section. It’s completely unacceptable and given CSULB’s history of supporting racists - I think they should be called out. An apology is overdue, not just from the writer himself but also from the editorial team for letting such garbage be published online.
You can leave a comment on the article itself or email the editor and their faculty advisor:
Editor in Chief – eicd49er@gmail.comDaily 49er Advisor – Barbara.Kingsley-Wilson@csulb.edu
Alternatively, tweet them at @daily49er
If you want more information you can check out this post. Thanks!

angryasiangirlsunited:

Hey, AAGU! I wanted to bring this atrocious piece of journalism to your attention. CSULB’s official student newspaper The Daily 49er has recently published a racist and xenophobic article about China. [x]

Some choice quotes include:

  • "Also, people in China love to yell, and have no concept of using “inside voices.”"
  •  ”Overall, people in China neglect to follow many of the social standards that we value in the West.”
  • "…if I had been one of those insufferable D-bags from the Jersey Shore, I would’ve left behind dozens of people with black eyes"
  • "Good luck trying to find anyone who is able to speak English."

This was written by the opinions editor of the paper - this person actually manages an entire section. It’s completely unacceptable and given CSULB’s history of supporting racists - I think they should be called out. An apology is overdue, not just from the writer himself but also from the editorial team for letting such garbage be published online.

You can leave a comment on the article itself or email the editor and their faculty advisor:

Editor in Chief – eicd49er@gmail.com
Daily 49er Advisor – Barbara.Kingsley-Wilson@csulb.edu

Alternatively, tweet them at @daily49er

If you want more information you can check out this post. Thanks!

(via thisisnotkorea)

two-browngirls:

AMBREEN SADIQ - ONE OF BRITAIN’S FIRST FEMALE MUSLIM BOXERS
I loved this recent article on boxer, Ambreen Sadiq. Not only has she fought and won numerous fights in the ring but she’s fought through the prejudice that some of her family members have about her profession. 
After appearing in the local newspapers and a Channel 4 documentary about her journey, Ambreen faced criticism and even death threats from men and women in the Muslim community. But she says that it isn’t the religion that causes the problem… 
““A lot of Muslim people say it’s about religion,” she says. “But I think it’s more about the culture and how people have been brought up. Men and women are treated equally [in the religion]. In the culture, it’s like the women should be at home cooking tea. The men put the food on the table.”
Now Ambreen’s story has been transformed into a play that is featuring at Edinburgh Festival - ‘No Guts, No Heart, No Glory’ check out the trailer here:

“It’s great that I can get my story out there,” says Sadiq. She wants to spread the message that Muslim girls can do whatever they want – whether dance, ballet, boxing, or football. “I think girls should be doing anything they want to be doing,” she insists.
 - S

two-browngirls:

AMBREEN SADIQ - ONE OF BRITAIN’S FIRST FEMALE MUSLIM BOXERS

I loved this recent article on boxer, Ambreen Sadiq. Not only has she fought and won numerous fights in the ring but she’s fought through the prejudice that some of her family members have about her profession. 

After appearing in the local newspapers and a Channel 4 documentary about her journey, Ambreen faced criticism and even death threats from men and women in the Muslim community. But she says that it isn’t the religion that causes the problem… 

“A lot of Muslim people say it’s about religion,” she says. “But I think it’s more about the culture and how people have been brought up. Men and women are treated equally [in the religion]. In the culture, it’s like the women should be at home cooking tea. The men put the food on the table.”

Now Ambreen’s story has been transformed into a play that is featuring at Edinburgh Festival - ‘No Guts, No Heart, No Glory’ check out the trailer here:

“It’s great that I can get my story out there,” says Sadiq. She wants to spread the message that Muslim girls can do whatever they want – whether dance, ballet, boxing, or football. “I think girls should be doing anything they want to be doing,” she insists.

- S

(via cielrouge)

pag-asaharibon:

not-your-asian-fantasy:

Early Feminism in the PhilippinesThe Philippines has been noted as having one of the smallest gender disparities in the world. The gender gap has been closed in both health and education; the country has had two female presidents (Corazon Aquino from 1986-1992 and Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo from 2001-2010); and had its first woman Supreme Court justice (Cecilia Muñoz Palma in 1973) before the United States had one (Sandra Day O’Connor in 1981). These achievements reflect a long history of efforts by women to involve themselves equally in governance as well as in society.

I was expecting a little bit more from the post and was suprised a few of these Filipinas were left out:
Gabriela Silang a revolutionary – a representation of female bravery – who fought against Spanish colonialism in the 18th century. Silang was a contrast to the chaste and religiously devout image of the Filipino lady as portrayed by Jose Rizal through his Spanish-language novels, Noli Me Tangere and El Filibusterismo. 
Clemencia Lopez became the first Filipino to enter the White House and the first to testify before a U.S. Senate hearing as a representative of her subjugated people.
Sofia Reyes de Veyra an educator, social worker and first secretary and co-founder (with Mary E. Coleman) of Asociacion Feminista Filipina, the first women’s club in the Philippines. Its establishment in June 1905 marked the start of the Feminist Movement in the country. She also organized the Manila Women’s Club which later became the nucleus of the National Federation of Women’s Clubs. This federation was in the forefront of the campaign to give women the right to vote and other rights. The women of the Philippines won these rights in 1931.
Dr. Carol Pagaduan-Araullo an UP cum laude graduate, medical doctor, 2012 UP Distinguished Alumni awardee and Bagong Alyansang Makabayan (BAYAN) chairperson. While Dr. Araullo was UP Student Council vice chairman and an activist imprisoned for opposing martial law.
Unabridged version of Hercules, California Councilmember Myrna de Vera’s speech, delivered during the 2012 Filipina Women’s Network’s 100 Most Influential Filipina Women of the US
Philippines was ranked 3rd highest in Asia Pacific region for gender equality according to the Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement report released by global financial firm MasterCard. Yet there’s still PH laws that are unfair to women.
Articles 
Filipinas who were first in PH history
I Am… Woman: Historic Filipinas
#SexTalk: Who is the Filipina of today?
Sampaguita Girl: The Pinay Activist Timeline
Women play key role in PH peace process
VIDEO: Where does the Filipino woman stand today?
Of race and gender clashes: Do women rise above labels?
'Breaking the Silence': The truth about abortion
Defending Filipino women from stereotypes
Importing, exporting stereotypes: How do global Pinays cope?
Barbara Jane Reyes: Virtual Blog Tour, Is Pinay Lit a Genre, and Tagging Others
Books
Denise Cruz’s Transpacific Femininities: The Making of the Modern Filipina
Mina Roces’ Women’s Movements and the Filipina 1986-2008
Melinda L. de Jesús’ Pinay Power: Peminist Critical Theory (reprinted this year)
chidtalk’s recommendations
A systems approach to improving maternal health in the Philippines by Dale Huntington, Eduardo Banzon, and Zenaida Dy Recidoro
Does Feminism Have to Address Race? by Latoya Peterson
Early Feminism in the Philippines by Athena Lydia Casambre and Steven Rood
Feminism and race in the Philippines
Feminism and the present image of Filipino women
Filipiniana: Philippine Women’s Studies
News From the Tropics: Is there Feminism in the Philippines?
Philippines: Feminists Converse on Social Movement Building
The changing role of women in Philippine society by Cicely Richard
The changing role of women in Philippine society by G. Fitzsimmon
The changing role of women in Philippine society by Zakiya Mahomed
Tumblr posts
chidtalk’s post on Filipin@s and Feminism
pinoy-culture’s 10 Kickass Pilipina Warriors in History That You Probably Never Heard Of

pag-asaharibon:

not-your-asian-fantasy:

Early Feminism in the Philippines

The Philippines has been noted as having one of the smallest gender disparities in the world. The gender gap has been closed in both health and education; the country has had two female presidents (Corazon Aquino from 1986-1992 and Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo from 2001-2010); and had its first woman Supreme Court justice (Cecilia Muñoz Palma in 1973) before the United States had one (Sandra Day O’Connor in 1981). These achievements reflect a long history of efforts by women to involve themselves equally in governance as well as in society.

I was expecting a little bit more from the post and was suprised a few of these Filipinas were left out:

  • Gabriela Silang a revolutionary – a representation of female bravery – who fought against Spanish colonialism in the 18th century. Silang was a contrast to the chaste and religiously devout image of the Filipino lady as portrayed by Jose Rizal through his Spanish-language novels, Noli Me Tangere and El Filibusterismo
  • Clemencia Lopez became the first Filipino to enter the White House and the first to testify before a U.S. Senate hearing as a representative of her subjugated people.
  • Sofia Reyes de Veyra an educator, social worker and first secretary and co-founder (with Mary E. Coleman) of Asociacion Feminista Filipinathe first women’s club in the Philippines. Its establishment in June 1905 marked the start of the Feminist Movement in the country. She also organized the Manila Women’s Club which later became the nucleus of the National Federation of Women’s Clubs. This federation was in the forefront of the campaign to give women the right to vote and other rights. The women of the Philippines won these rights in 1931.
  • Dr. Carol Pagaduan-Araullo an UP cum laude graduate, medical doctor, 2012 UP Distinguished Alumni awardee and Bagong Alyansang Makabayan (BAYAN) chairperson. While Dr. Araullo was UP Student Council vice chairman and an activist imprisoned for opposing martial law.

Unabridged version of Hercules, California Councilmember Myrna de Vera’s speech, delivered during the 2012 Filipina Women’s Network’s 100 Most Influential Filipina Women of the US

Philippines was ranked 3rd highest in Asia Pacific region for gender equality according to the Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement report released by global financial firm MasterCard. Yet there’s still PH laws that are unfair to women.

Articles 

Books

chidtalk’s recommendations

Tumblr posts

(via miumiumiao)

real talk.

caprediem:

what i’m about to talk about doesn’t come easy. kinda like how i made posts about the complexities of calling out se asians in kpop fandoms and what not—-i feel v uncomfortable talking about this. but. as i did then, this needs to be addressed.

let’s talk about discrimination of asians by other poc.
and why every fucking time someone wants to bring it up or talk about it, the conversation is redirected to the discrimination perpetuated by asians.
and why that is not fucking okay.

and before anyone even dares to derail this post/convo, let me make it clear for you. i am not cosigning ANY anti-blackness, appropriative, discriminatory actions committed by asians. all of that is gross, wrong, and reprehensible. 
got it? good.

so when asians point out the discrimination asians face (by anyone not just poc but this tends to happen esp when we talk about discrimination we face by other poc), it gets real fucking annoying when each time some smartass wants to derail the convo by pointing out shit like “but antiblackness” “but asians that discriminate against *insert non-asian poc group here*” like why the fuck are you fucking trying to make this about you? ITS NOT LIKE WE’RE COSIGNING ANY OF THIS SHIT. IF YOU CHECK OUR BLOGS OUT. YOU SEE US DISCUSSING IT. WE’RE NOT GONNA GIVE OUR PEOPLE A FREEBIE PASS (its not even ours to give). BUT LITERALLY THESE CONVERSATIONS AREN’T ABOUT THE SHIT YOU FACE. IT’S ABOUT THE SHIT WE FACE. 

a group of people can face discrimination yet also discriminate.
antiblackness and discrimination of non-asian poc exist in asian communities. discrimination of asians exists in non-asian poc communities. THESE TWO THINGS CAN CO-EXIST. 

seriously. when i, as a diasporic korean, wanna talk about say the bull fuckery of poc koreaboos and call them out. why does someone wanna point out antiblackness (also like obv when i say this, i’m not saying black ppl are the only ones who pull this shit. cause like i have non-black, non-asian—-cause yes you can be both—poc tryna bring this up too) in kpop as if i cosign that shit? WHY. HOW IS IT RELEVANT. also do you even realize how imperialism and colonization played/play a part in the antiblackness in kpop and korea (i’m still not excusing the behavior but this is important in understanding it)???? are you assholes not able to understand that shit intersects all the fucking time? 

also another thing, oftentimes when they say “asian” ppl mean “e asians”. i really feel like i shouldn’t need to explain how fucking problematic that is but i will. asia is not just e asia. and as an e asian, i know v well that my people needs to work on allowing s and se asians (but esp se asians) speak within our larger communities. so i’m not saying the blame is all on other non-asian poc. what i am saying is, y’all don’t help the goddamn situation. if you wanna talk about a specific asian population, SPELL OUT THE FUCKING GROUP. asia is h u g e. like you’re gonna need to specify. cause i bet your fucking ass that if i was like, “okay so what about antiblackness in burma/myanmar” you’d be looking at me like “say what now” when hey guess what burma/myanmar is. in. fucking. asia. 

i mean seriously. why is it that asian bloggers are only allowed to talk about discrimination in asian communities it’s only either
1. discrimination by white ppl
2. discrimination by asians
how would you feel like it every time you tried to talk about an important issue within your community, someone jumps in and chimes in about how that one time someone in your community was discriminatory? i’m not joking, each time there’s at least that one person. or haha how about when you wanna talk about how people outside your community discriminate your people and then those very same fucking people go, “but you guys do it to us too”. i mean are we fucking 5 right now? so if i fucking stabbed you right now and then you stabbed me, i’m can say “but they stabbed me too.” i mean do you say how wrong this kind of behavior is? 

the fact that you face discrimination doesn’t negate the fact that you are discriminating. the fact that you are also a poc doesn’t somehow give you an immunity pass. if you fetishize or dehumanize us, you need to fucking stop and you WILL be called out. if you appropriate from us, you need to fucking stop and you WILL be called out. stop acting like this is coming out of nowhere. you can’t demand respect for your humanity and forsake ours in the same breath. fuck off with that shit,

(via khinaye)

"Elmo is with his good friend, Lupita. They are talking about all the great things about their skin. For example, Elmo’s skin just happens to be very ticklish. Lupita’s skin happens to be a beautiful brown color. Skin can come in all different shades and colors. Isn’t skin just the best? However, ticklish or smooth or black or brown or white or tan, be sure to love the skin you are in." 

(via asexualstarlord)

yellowxperil:

Are you interested in learning more about the political history of the Vietnamese American community of Orange County?Attend our Viet Gathering Little Sai-Gon political tour!The event will be Saturday September 20th from 5pm-7pm. We will be exploring six political sites around Westminster that are significant in the formation of the Vietnamese American community of Orange County.We are also planning on having guest speakers for the political tour and having dinner in the area as well. If you are interested please fill out this google doc.https://docs.google.com/forms/d/14rIQkRbpyGbQ_qfeOrgcUVvLEHMhyVfegpBKlxk6dV0/viewform?c=0&w=1Details about where we will be meeting will be emailed to those who fill out the document.This event is organized by the So Cal Viet Gathering.For more information please contact:Ethan Nguyen (ethan.k.nguyen88@gmail.com, 714-837-1649)Lisa Le - lisatkle@gmail.comDavid Dang - directfuldang@gmail.com
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yellowxperil:

Are you interested in learning more about the political history of the Vietnamese American community of Orange County?

Attend our Viet Gathering Little Sai-Gon political tour!

The event will be Saturday September 20th from 5pm-7pm. We will be exploring six political sites around Westminster that are significant in the formation of the Vietnamese American community of Orange County.

We are also planning on having guest speakers for the political tour and having dinner in the area as well. If you are interested please fill out this google doc.

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/14rIQkRbpyGbQ_qfeOrgcUVvLEHMhyVfegpBKlxk6dV0/viewform?c=0&w=1

Details about where we will be meeting will be emailed to those who fill out the document.

This event is organized by the So Cal Viet Gathering.

For more information please contact:
Ethan Nguyen (ethan.k.nguyen88@gmail.com, 714-837-1649)
Lisa Le - lisatkle@gmail.com
David Dang - directfuldang@gmail.com

fb event page

(via blackperil)