4 must-read short stories by writers of color from the New Yorker

blackgirlstalking:

The newyorker is giving free access to their archives going back to 2007, and it inspired us to compile a short but hot list of must-reads for the rest of the summer. The website also has a new design that makes it easier to read long-forms like the ones listed below. Most of these selected stories are driven by rare, complex, sometimes unbearable, but always humane female characters; an issue we also talked about during episodes 16 and 32 of the podcast while discussing women anti-heroes on television.

So, here are the four short stories you should read for the summerBGT approved!

image

*

Back in 2012, Junot Díaz published a short-story named Monstro in the sci-fi issue of the magazine. If you’ve read his interview “The Search for Decolonial Love,” you were probably intrigued by this story of “this fourteen-year-old girl, a poor, black, Dominican girl, half-Haitian—one of the Island’s damnés—saving the world.” Well, here it is and let’s hope this is a snapshot of something bigger to come.

Read “Monstro

You may have noticed we have a soft spot for Junot. This one recounts the tale of a young runaway Dominican girl trying to escape her mother’s stifling and abusive presence.

Read “Wildwood

ZZ Packer ‘s “Drinking Coffee Elsewhere”  was featured in the magazine’s “Debut Fiction” issue in 2000 and already showed the writer’s talent at painting awkward and nerve-racking situations with a biting voice. What stands out in this story is a rare and vulnerable portrait of a young black woman in denialDina, who must confront the inevitable experience of loss. 

Read “Drinking Coffee Elsewhere

There is an embassy oddly located in the suburbs, a maid named Fatou and a badminton game. From that place and around this character, Zadie Smith weaves an intriguing story given rhythm by a hypnotic badminton game. There is a distinctive sense of detail, unexpected characters and we love the idea of the importance of “imperfect knowledge” subtly advocated in the piece.

Read “The Embassy of Cambodia”

You can check out all the New Yorker short stories here.

Make sure to listen to our discussion on women and anti-heroes in the last podcast with Bim Adewunmi, as well as in episode 16. Comment, send us questions on Twitter, Facebook or Tumblr; we’ll gladly reply!

(via cielrouge)

asker

Anonymous asked: I'm legitimately confused. If Israel were committing genocide, wouldn't they have done it already? They definitely have the military power.

readyokaygo:

"Done it already"? What do you mean? See, this is the problem. Because most people only have the Holocaust as a frame of reference for genocide, they think if it doesn’t look like the Holocaust then it isn’t a genocide.

Duration, intensity, and number killed does not determine whether something is a genocide. A genocide could take place in a few months, or it could go on for a century. It could involve crude weapons or intricate systems of extermination. Death is not the only measure of genocide, and so long as people are being systematically targeted simply because they are from one racial or ethnic group, can you really put a number on how many people killed is too much?

Destruction and appropriation of culture is a method of genocide. Theft of indigenous water, land, and resources is a method of genocide. Segregation and humiliation is a method of genocide. Concentrating people into densely populated spaces, bombing neighborhoods, flattening power plants, and destroying schools as refugees sleep in them is a method of genocide. Pouring wine down someone’s throat when his religion forbids it while he and his family are stopped at daily checkpoints is a method of genocide. Pouring gas down a boy’s throat and burning him alive is a method of genocide. Funding and producing movies, domestically and abroad, that show one group of people as barbaric, terrorists, homophobic, sexist, uncivilized, backwards, and so on, is a method of genocide.

Israel has been committing genocide against Palestinians for nearly a century. I would argue that they also committed genocide against the Lebanese. The United States committed genocide against the people of Iraq, starting with Clinton. Genocide is being committed against Latin@s in the American South. Genocide is still being committed against Black people, and the prison industrial complex is working hard to continue it. Is it any surprise that police officers from New York to Chicago to LA train in Israel with their finest and best? Is it any surprise that Israel is the largest exporter of drones as the US continues killing children in Pakistan and Yemen? They are one and the same, genocidal settler colonial states from the start.

Genocide is a system of deprivation and destruction that takes on many forms. Anyone that tells you any different is protecting someone, or themselves as they benefit from it.

nativeamericannews:

Miss Native American University of Arizona
“Miss Native American University of Arizona and her First Attendant serve as ambassadors for the Native American population at the University of Arizona. Both women are able to live in two worlds by practicing traditional values by incorporating them into the contemporary society in which they live. Both also represent womanhood and fulfill the role of “grandmother, mother, aunt, and sister” to the Native American people at the UA and is able to speak as a leader, teacher, counselor, advisor, and friend.”

nativeamericannews:

Miss Native American University of Arizona


“Miss Native American University of Arizona and her First Attendant serve as ambassadors for the Native American population at the University of Arizona. Both women are able to live in two worlds by practicing traditional values by incorporating them into the contemporary society in which they live. Both also represent womanhood and fulfill the role of “grandmother, mother, aunt, and sister” to the Native American people at the UA and is able to speak as a leader, teacher, counselor, advisor, and friend.”

(via blackperil)

AAVE AND WHY IT IS MORE THAN LIKELY CULTURAL APPROPRIATION TO SPEAK IT IF IT ISN’T YOUR FIRST LANGUAGE

nomorewaterthefirenexttime:

If you believe that AAVE is not cultural appropriation, you are going to want to stop reading this and respond to me multiple times throughout the post. Don’t. Read it all the way through.

________________________

89% of the time, this is the argument for why cultural appropriation is okay:

"Don’t you want to share your culture with other people?!”

Especially to people who lack a “culture,” the answer may come as a surprise to you: no. I do not want to share something that you do not understand, that you have no connection to whatsoever, that you commodify for these reasons—I don’t want to share my culture with you.

Particularly, AAVE.

AAVE is a language. This means it has its own grammatical structure, vocabulary, nuances and means of communication. It is a language that I speak and understand around family and black friends. It is, like all other languages, best understood if learned from birth than if adopted later in life.

It isn’t “cool” or “wrong” or “funny,” but a language that when spoken by me is as normal to my tongue as American English.

When people who are not first-language AAVE speakers use AAVE, it is often

  1. In jest (why do black people pronounce words wrong let me do it to imitate people I think are more stupid than me), or
  2. Used to look cool (I think using AAVE in my slam poetry for open mic night will make it so deep; I am a white anarchist but I use AAVE because I’m urban and inclusive; that’s so dope! sup bro! ratchet! ill! this shirt is bad!)

I know what you’re thinking: this is just a language and languages are adopted all the time. Here is why you are ignorant and wrong and what is happening is actually appropriation:

The most important feature of appropriation is the stealing of something from another culture and changing-meaning of, either by diluting the meaning or just changing the meaning in general, the cultural thing that has been stolen. Guess what non-AAVE speakers?

When you use AAVE: You don’t use the shit correctly.

When you insert random AAVE into your conversation, it is equivalent to taking a word randomly from one language and using it in an English sentence. In cases where translations are direct (objects), this is usually fine and doesn’t change the meaning at all. In cases where the translation is not direct, you are literally (follow the logic)

  • taking a word that your language does not have a meaning for and then
  • changing the meaning of that word to fit into the context of your language and life.

Especially with regard to AAVE stolen from popular black media, which is more available to non-AAVE speakers and is therefore more accessed and appropriated, non-AAVE speaking audiences will adopt the word and, using the only language context they know, will unknowingly change the meaning of the word just because it’s what makes sense to them.

The problem is that AAVE takes more than context clues. In AAVE, the way a thing is said can change the meaning of it. It is not a tonal language, but a lot of things in AAVE are implied, which is why many black people do what is considered rude and “interrupt” someone when they’re talking.

The truth is that we have learned from a very young age to anticipate meaning in a sentence and oftentimes, especially because AAVE is our first language, will naturally do this (even when the meaning we interpret is incorrect). It is also AAVE-speaking customary to interrupt someone while they are talking, because since we have already anticipated the ending of a sentence, it’s not necessary for them to finish it.

Because of the social standing of Blacks in the US, a lot of AAVE is taken and appropriated to mean something negative or pejorative even when it is not meant to be so.

Taking examples from popular media of AAVE being taken and appropriated, I will use the popular and commonly mistaken Ratchet Girl Anthem (video starts at 1:35). Before analyzing what the word ratchet really means vs. how AAVE-appropriators use it, I would like to point out how cultural appropriation of AAVE takes place in the first place:

  1. Person who is non-AAVE speaking hears this song
  2. Person hears the word “ratchet,” which is not currently a word/does not have meaning in their vocabulary
  3. Person concludes using context clues and inflection of the singers’ voices that “ratchet” indeed is something undesirable
  4. Because of social standing of Blacks and the various stereotypes of Black people in the club are played up in this song, the person assumes the word “ratchet” must relate to qualities of Black culture that society has deemed “undesirable”
  5. Person associates the word “ratchet” with all negative stereotypes of black people, even when that is not what the word is used for, because that is what makes sense to them in their lingo-social context

And if you are a non-AAVE speaker, think of how you’ve been using the word, “ratchet.” If someone is loud or boisterous, a quality associated with “negative aspects of Black culture,” you might call them ratchet. If you pass a black person up and they do something you deem “ghetto,” you might call them ratchet.

At this point, the word goes on to take a meaning that can be substituted for any negative thing or event you as a non-AAVE speaker encounter. Burn a cake? Ratchet. Clumsily trip over a backpack? Ratchet. Someone cuts you off? Ratchet.

But here’s the thing:

Ratchet simply means (and fellow Black brethren please help me translate this) to be poorly suited. To not be dressed your best. To look bad.

Seriously. Look at when they use it in the song:

OMG, what do she have on? (She ratchet)
Her lace front is all wrong. (She ratchet)
Boy bye, not with them shoes on (He ratchet) 

AAVE speakers pick up on this immediately, because we are able to discern what exactly they’re labeling as “ratchet.” Non-AAVE speakers will hear the whole song—the part where they glorify child support, and babydaddies getting out of prison, and getting new merchandise—and incorrectly assume these things (which are also stereotypically considered the be negative qualities of Black culture) are included in the ratchet part.

You have to remember, as a non-AAVE speaker, you may learn the occasional word, but there is a whole grammatical structure that you do not understand at all and it inhibits your comprehension of rap songs. It is easy to believe you understand it, but why do you think black people laugh when non-AAVE speakers cover rap songs, or use words they heard from rap songs?

When you cover a rap song, it is equivalent to a poor Spanish speaker covering a Spanish song; when you use words you hear from rap songs, you often use them incorrectly even without knowing.

The problem, though, is that 75% of this country is white, and most of those white people are using words they’ve adopted from AAVE. Incorrectly. When they change the meanings of these words, it’s appropriation.

Why that is more harmful than you think:

The case of ratchet, where a word that is used to describe someone’s attire is incorrectly attributed to negative aspects of the whole black race, is indicative of most cultural appropriation of AAVE. AAVE ends up being appropriated by non-AAVE speakers and then used against AAVE speakers, a group that is 99.9999% black. Words in AAVE that don’t mean anything negative will, when appropriated, become negative in meaning or negative in connotation simply because they are words that originated from black culture.

Most importantly It’s an unspoken rule that AAVE, when spoken by white people, is cute, not ignorant, and playful. When spoken by black people, it’s “ghetto.” AAVE spoken by a white person can cost them respectability or professionalism; AAVE when spoken by black people can cost them a job, opportunities, and even their own livelihood. If a you passed up a white person speaking AAVE, you’d think, “He’s playing around.” If you passed a black person speaking it, even if they were playing around, you’d think, “Why can’t they speak English correctly?”

Most importantly, it creates a false sense in oppressors that we are all laughing at the same thing. When black people laugh at AAVE, we are laughing at the language and how it is used. When non-AAVE speakers laugh at AAVE, you are laughing at blackness; you’re laughing at what you think is more ignorant and stupid than you.

Because you don’t understand.

Do you see why I would not want you to “share” that part of my culture? That isn’t sharing at all. That’s bastardizing.

(via blackperil)

Hey everyone!

treebeards:

I am currently interning for the Asian American Literary Review, which is a seasonal publication dedicated to carving a creative space for Asian American writers.

My project for the summer is to look for talented, emerging/mid-career writers whose voices are relevant to AALR’s vision, and feature them in an upcoming issue.

If you or anyone you know wants to submit any work (poetry or prose), or has any suggestions for me, please feel free to shoot me a fanmail or message! Reblogging this to get the word out will also help me greatly. Thanks so much!

(via isanah)

K: I feel like I need to make this post here because idk

Looking back, a good chunk of our antiblackness tag is police brutality. It’s all mostly horrible violence to black people BY THE POLICE.

I’m fucking sick and disgusted.

priceofliberty:

thinksquad:

Newly obtained surveillance video shows the violent encounter between a 17-year-old girl and Clairton police officers that left the teenager in the hospital.

A 17-year-old girl claims she was beaten by police in Clairton after she and her friends were stopped for a curfew violation Tuesday night.

Merceedez Wright admits she and her friends were out a few minutes after the city’s 10 p.m. curfew, and that she both ran from officers and resisted them after being tackled, but she doesn’t believe she deserves the injuries she suffered.

Wright is now recovering in the hospital with injuries to her trachea, esophagus and neck, plus several cuts and bruises.

"She’s a cheerleader, she’s a lifeguard at the Clairton pool, she was just on prom court," said Wright’s mother, Audelia Amoah. "She’s a good kid."

Even so, Wright admits she ran from officers.

"I was scared because of how he got out of the car. He didn’t just walk out, he jumped out of the car and started chasing me, so my first instinct was to run," she said.

Wright also said she did resist officers once she was knocked to the ground. She said she was trying to get her arms free to protect herself.

Clairton police did not respond to requests for comment.

Read more: http://www.wtae.com/news/teenage-girl-says-police-beat-her-after-curfew-violation/26992088#ixzz388DHjtCm

You think this is sickening? Me too

551 Ravensburg Blvd
Clairton, PA
(412) 233-8113

press ‘OPTION 6’ to be connected to the Clairton Police Department.

Flood their mailbox, flood their inbox!

Robert Hoffman is the Chief of Police and you can contact them directly here.

I just wrote in: “Newly obtained surveillance video shows the violent encounter between 17-year-old Merceedez Wright and Clairton police officers that left the teenager in the hospital.

She admits to being out past 10pm AND to “running” from the cops. When I was her age, I was in the same situation and the altercation did not result in me being tackled, in my head or neck being smashed against pavement, or a hospital bill.

I was told to call my mother while the officer POLITELY waited there for her to come pick me up. How is CPD training these officers that their first course of action is to pummel a little girl? The officers involved should be reprimanded without compensation.”

(via blackperil)

Hello everybody!

middleeasternsarecool:

This blog is a safespot for Middle Easterns. We’re widely ignored in a lot discourse about racism and I’m hoping with this blog we can bring us into the light. This blog will not do a lot of discussion about Islam because Islam is not the only religion in the Middle East and I want to be as inclusive as possible to all Middle Easterns. I also want this blog to be a place where we can praise and uplift each other. Here you can submit things about your country and then we can fawn over it together! 

(via blackperil)

blackourstory:

What - you thought we only had the Black Panthers? Think again.

(via kreepkween)

therainbowhub:

The Rainbow Hub, a media website for LGBTQIA persons, is looking to fill four writing positions for our site. We pride ourselves on offering content relevant to everyone in the LGBTQIA community, and to that end, we’re looking to bring in new voices to our staff. 
A book reviewer
An LGBTQIA POC columnist
A news writer
A features writer
We’re looking for folks who can contribute one to two columns a month, two book reviews a month, one to two feature pieces a month, and regular news pieces. This is a paid position, and we need writers who can commit to meeting deadlines. Please do not apply if you will not be able to maintain a regular schedule with us. For questions or to apply, please send us an email at submissions@therainbowhub.com including your preferred pronouns, a short writing sample, and your availability. Don’t forget to tell us a little bit about yourself.
Signal boosting is always appreciated.

therainbowhub:

The Rainbow Hub, a media website for LGBTQIA persons, is looking to fill four writing positions for our site. We pride ourselves on offering content relevant to everyone in the LGBTQIA community, and to that end, we’re looking to bring in new voices to our staff. 

  • A book reviewer
  • An LGBTQIA POC columnist
  • A news writer
  • A features writer

We’re looking for folks who can contribute one to two columns a month, two book reviews a month, one to two feature pieces a month, and regular news pieces. This is a paid position, and we need writers who can commit to meeting deadlines. Please do not apply if you will not be able to maintain a regular schedule with us. For questions or to apply, please send us an email at submissions@therainbowhub.com including your preferred pronouns, a short writing sample, and your availability. Don’t forget to tell us a little bit about yourself.

Signal boosting is always appreciated.

(via kceyagi)